linux

Using stunnel and TinyProxy to obfuscate HTTP traffic

Recently there has been a lot of coverage in both tech and non-tech news outlets about internet privacy and how to prevent snooping both from service providers and governments. In this article I am going to show one method of anonymizing internet traffic; using a TLS enabled HTTP/HTTPS Proxy. In this article we will walk through using stunnel to create a TLS tunnel with an instance of TinyProxy on the other side.

Improving Linux System Performance with I/O Scheduler Tuning

Let's adjust a Linux I/O scheduler to get the best performance out of a Linux system. We'll measure the impact of those changes with `pgbench`.

Using salt-ssh to install Salt

In recent articles I covered how I've built a Continuous Delivery pipeline for my blog. These articles talk about using Docker to build a container for my blog, using Travis CI to test and build that container, and finally using a Masterless SaltStack configuration to deploy the blog. Once setup, this pipeline enables me to publish new posts by simply managing them within a GitHub repository. The nice thing about this setup is that not only are blog posts managed hands-free.

Creating a swap file for tiny cloud servers

A few months ago while setting up a few cloud servers to host one of my applications. I started running into an interesting issue while building Docker containers. During the docker build execution my servers ran out of memory causing the Docker build to fail. The servers in question only have about 512MB of RAM and the Docker execution was using the majority of the available memory. My solution to this problem was simple, add a swap file.

Create self-managing servers with Masterless Saltstack Minions

Over the past two articles I've described building a Continuous Delivery pipeline for my blog (the one you are currently reading). The first article covered packaging the blog into a Docker container and the second covered using Travis CI to build the Docker image and perform automated testing against it. While the first two articles covered quite a bit of the CD pipeline there is one piece missing; automating deployment. While there are many infrastructure and application tools for automated deployments I've chosen to use Saltstack.

Using Travis CI to test Docker builds

In last months article we discussed “Dockerizing” this blog. What I left out from that article was how I also used Docker Hub's automatic builds functionality to automatically create a new image every time changes are made to the GitHub Repository which contains the source for this blog. The automatic builds are useful because I can simply make changes to the code or articles within the repository and once pushed, those changes trigger Docker Hub to build an image using the Dockerfile we created in the previous article.

Getting started with Docker by Dockerizing this Blog

Docker is an interesting technology that over the past 2 years has gone from an idea, to being used by organizations all over the world to deploy applications. In today's article I am going to cover how to get started with Docker by “Dockerizing” an existing application. The application in question is actually this very blog! What is Docker Before we dive into learning the basics of Docker let's first understand what Docker is and why it is so popular.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Troubleshooting Guide

Identify, capture and resolve common issues faced by Red Hat Enterprise Linux administrators using best practices and advanced troubleshooting techniques

A Quick and Practical Reference for tcpdump

When it comes to tcpdump most admins fall into two categories; they either know tcpdump and all of its flags like the back of their hand, or they kind of know it but need to use a reference for anything outside of the basic usage. The reason for this is because tcpdump is a pretty advanced command and it is pretty easy to get into the depths of how networking works when using it.

Understanding Exit Codes and how to use them in bash scripts

Lately I've been working on a lot of automation and monitoring projects, a big part of these projects are taking existing scripts and modifying them to be useful for automation and monitoring tools. One thing I have noticed is sometimes scripts use exit codes and sometimes they don't. It seems like exit codes are easy for poeple to forget, but they are an incredibly important part of any script. Especially if that script is used for the command line.